Apple Tree Notary​ in Charlotte

​980-785-3695

The apple tree (Malus domestica) is a deciduous tree in the rose family best known for its sweet, pomaceous fruit, the apple. It is cultivated worldwide as a fruit tree, and is the most widely grown species in the genus Malus. The tree originated in Central Asia, where its wild ancestor, Malus sieversii, is still found today. Apples have been grown for thousands of years in Asia and Europe, and were brought to North America by European colonists. Apples have religious and mythological significance in many cultures, including Norse, Greek and European Christian traditions.

Apple trees are large if grown from seed, but small if grafted onto roots (rootstock). There are more than 7,500 known cultivars of apples, resulting in a range of desired characteristics. Different cultivars are bred for various tastes and uses, including cooking, eating raw and cider production. Apples are generally propagated by grafting, although wild apples grow readily from seed. Trees and fruit are prone to a number of fungal, bacterial and pest problems, which can be controlled by a number of organicand non-organic means. In 2010, the fruit's genome was decoded as part of research on disease control and selective breeding in apple production.

About 80 million tons of apples were grown worldwide in 2013, and China produced almost half of this total.[3] The United States is the second-leading producer, with more than 6% of world production. Turkey is third, followed by Italy, India and Poland. Apples are often eaten raw, but can also be found in many prepared foods (especially desserts) and drinks. Many beneficial health effects are thought to result from eating apples; however, two types of allergies are attributed to various proteins found in the fruit. 
 ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apple )


Grown in temperate zones throughout the world and cultivated for at least 3,000 years, apple varieties now number well into the thousands. Apples range in color from lemony yellow to bright yellow-green to crimson red. Their textures range from tender to crisp, their flavors from sweet to tart and from simple to complex. They're available year-round but are at their best in the autumn when newly harvested. Buy firm, well-colored apples with a fresh (never musty) fragrance. The skins should be smooth and free of bruises and gouges. Scald (a dry, tan- or brown-colored area on the skin of an apple) doesn't usually affect its flavor. Apples come two to four per pound, depending on size. Store apples in a cool, dark place. They do well placed in a plastic bag and stored in the refrigerator. Choose apples by how you intend to use them — for eating raw or cooking. All-purpose apples, good for eating raw as well as for cooking, include the following: Baldwin, Braeburn, Cortland, Criterion, Fuji, Gala, Golden Delicious, Granny Smith, Gravenstein, Jonagold, Jonathan, Lady apple, Macoun, McIntosh, Newtown Pippin (also known simply as Pippin), Northern Spy, Pink Lady, Rhode Island Greening, Stayman Winesap, Winesap and York Imperial. For whole baked apples, the apple of choice is Rome beauty. Other good bakers are Braeburn, Gala, Gravenstein and York Imperial. Apples are a good source of vitamins A and C. They're also rich in the powerful flavonoid quercetin, which acts as antioxidant and may prevent some some cancers and protect the arteries and heart. Whole fruit is better than apple juice, which loses 80 percent of its quercetin during processing. See also candied apple; crabapple; may apple; red delicious.  Read more at: http://www.foodterms.com/encyclopedia/apple/index.html?oc=linkbackType.